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Articles

USCIS Important Announcement – 07/29/2016

The service of citizenship and immigration in the United States (Uscis, for its acronym in English), announced an expansion of the process of current interim exemption, in order to allow certain people who are relatives of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents (Lprs, For its acronym in English),
The benefit of the provisional waiver also extends to the spouses and children that accompany or come to join the main immigrants. In addition, individuals with final orders of deportation will also be eligible for the provisional exemptions, if they meet certain provision. See More

USCIS to Allow Additional Applicants for Provisional Waiver Process U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced a final rule expanding the existing…

USCIS Announcement – 07/08/2016

Temporary Protected Status Extended for El Salvador
Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of El Salvador (and those without nationality who last habitually resided in El Salvador) for an additional 18 months, effective Sept. 10, 2016, through March 9, 2018.

USCIS Announcement – 05/16/2016

Temporary Protected Status Extended for Honduras
Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of Honduras (and those without nationality who last habitually resided in Honduras) for an additional 18 months, effective July 6, 2016, through Jan. 5, 2018.

USCIS Announcement – 05/16/2016

Temporary Protected Status Extended for Nicaragua
Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of Nicaragua (and those without nationality who last habitually resided in Nicaragua) for an additional 18 months, effective July 6, 2016, through Jan. 5, 2018.

USCIS Announcement – 09/15/2015

We are happy to announce that the Department of State and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) together have made an announcement that certain individuals who are waiting for priority dates to become available and who are stuck in backlogs can actually start their application process before their priority dates have become current.  By allowing these individuals to file their applications before the priority date, they will be eligible for work authorizations.   Beginning October 1, 2015, the visa bulletin will contain two charts, one for those who have to process outside of the country (Visa Process) and those who can adjust their status in the United States.    USCIS has also provided a fact sheet explaining the new procedures.  The “Filing Date” for most of the family-based categories is less than one year and up to around two years earlier than the “Final Action Date,” Married children of U.S. Citizens from Mexico may be eligible to apply more than two years before the priority date listed on the approval notice.  The changes will show the following:Immigrant Visa (Consular Processing): Applicants with priority dates earlier than the date listed on the “Filing Date” chart for their preference category and country of chargeability will be notified by the National Visa Center that they may assemble and submit their documentation and begin the immigrant visa application process earlier than expected. A final decision on the immigrant visa application will not occur until the priority date is current, however, as shown on the Final Action Date chart.Adjustment of Status: Applicants who are in the United States and are eligible for adjustment of status (because they entered with a visa or have a petition pending prior to April 30, 2001) must use the “Final Action Date” chart to determine when they may submit their applications for adjustment of status, unless the Visa Bulletin indicates that they may instead use the “Filing Date” chart. The early “Filing Date” chart may only be used by adjustment applicants if it is determined that there are sufficient immigrant visas available to support the filing of additional adjustment applications beyond that which would be received under the “Final Action Date” chart.This is very exciting news as those individuals who are in the United States and are eligible for adjustment of status (because they entered with a visa or have a petition pending prior to April 30, 2001) can begin filing their applications will also be able to obtain employment authorizations as adjustment applicants. Applicants can use the “Final Action Date” chart each month to determine when they may submit their applications for adjustment of status.  This may change on a monthly basis depending on whether there are sufficient immigrant visas available.

Please contact our office and schedule an appointment if you would like us to review your approval notice to see if you are eligible to start your applications for permanent residence.

USCIS Link in English:  http://www.uscis.gov/news/uscis-announces-revised-procedures-determining-visa-availability-applicants-waiting-file-adjustment-status

USCIS Link in Spanish:  https://www.uscis.gov/news-topics-es/visas

Executive Action Q & A – 11/20/2014

Click the link provided by the Department of Homeland Security for questions and answers on Obama’s announcement on Executive Action: Executive Actions on Immigration

Sheriff Stanek Statement on U.S. Immigration and Customs Detainers

Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office News Release June 11, 2014 ( Minneapolis)

Hennepin County Sheriff Rich Stanek has issued the following statement: Effective Thursday, June 12, the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office will no longer honor U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainers absent judicial authority.

The Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office receives approximately 36,000 inmates each year.  Of those 36,000 inmates, approximately 1.5 percent have a detainer placed on them by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.  U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainers is a request for local jails to hold individuals up to 48 hours after their local charges have been satisfied

Historically, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainers were interpreted as “mandatory,” requiring jails to honor them.  However, recent directives by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement that detainers are discretionary and subsequent Federal Court decisions articulating the same, are strong indicators that the legal landscape is changing. Therefore the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office will no longer honor U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainers absent judicial authority.

My decision comes after a long, thoughtful, and deliberate process that included meetings and discussions with Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman, residents across Hennepin County, local and national elected officials, the Sheriff’s Office Community Advisory Board, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and representatives from the many diverse communities of Hennepin County.

My first responsibility as Sheriff of Hennepin County will always be to enforce the law and abide by the Constitution.

Rich Stanek
Hennepin County Sheriff

Secretary Johnson Announces Process for DACA Renewal | USCIS – 06/05/2014

www.uscis.gov
Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson announced the process for DACA renewal today! If you have DACA, speak to your attorney to discuss renewing. You may begin the renewal process up to four months before your deferred action expires. See the press release below for more information.
WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson today announced the process for individuals to renew enrollment in the Deferred Action for Childhood…

EOIR – Executive Office for Immigration Review Formally Announced Relocation – 06/02/2014

“The Bloomington immigration court, “Executive Office for Immigration Review or EOIR” formally announced on June 2nd that the Bloomington Immigration Court will close on 7/2/14 to prepare for relocation to their new building. Their new address is:

Bishop Henry Whipple Federal Building
1 Federal Drive, Suite 1850, Fort Snelling, Minn. 55111.
The phone number has not changed, 612-725-3765

The Bloomington Immigration Court will recommence hearings at its new location on 7/7/14.

Please note if you are driving, you will be required to show your driver’s license.  If you do not have one, we have been informed your car may be towed.  If you do not have a driver’s license, you should take public transportation (the train has a stop at the Bishop Henry Whipple Federal Building) or get a ride from someone who has a driver’s license.

Also note that all persons entering the Bishop Henry Whipple Federal Building must show a government-issued ID (MN Driver’s License, Passport from your country, Identification from your country, School ID)  If you do not have an ID, a guard will escort you to the courtroom.

USCIS Policy Memo: Parole of Spouses, Children and Parents of Active Duty Members of the U.S. Armed Forces [and more] USCIS, Nov. 15, 2013.

“Parole of Spouses, Children and Parents of Active Duty Members of the U.S. Armed Forces, the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, and Former Members of the U.S. Armed Forces or Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve and the Effect of Parole on Inadmissibility under Immigration and Nationality Act § 212(a)(6)(A)(i) This policy memorandum (PM) amends Chapter 21.1 of the Adjudicator’s Field Manual (AFM) to ensure consistent adjudication of parole requests made on behalf of aliens who are present without admission or parole and who are spouses, children and parents of those serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces, in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve or who previously served in the U.S. Armed Forces or Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve. This PM also amends AFM Chapter 40.6 concerning the effects of parole on an alien’s inadmissibility under Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) § 212(a)(6)(A)(i). This amendment to AFM chapter 40.6 applies to any paroled alien, not only to the family members of Armed Forces personnel.”